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English 63
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)
enhancing and building more power grids. pakistan needs power. it needs access to energy. afghanistan needs power. if you create interdependency between these countries, especially countries that are not on friendly terms with each other, which will enhance the chances of stability to allot more more expensive projects could be pipelines and others, but at least the national grid, railroads. fortunately, pakistan is extending its railroad into kandahar. the railroad from central asia will connect now across afghanistan, north and south. we can really rebuild afghanistan as a crossroad or roundabout of trade. that is key. internally, improving access to capital in afghanistan by providing political incentives, in terms of political assurance, making more credit available for investment by international companies in afghanistan, allowing afghan companies to have access to easier credit -- these are the key issues that could help afghanistan on the economic front. more importantly, a clear message about the future of afghanistan that would give the investors and everyone else a sense of confid
are important for the role of pakistan and many others. with that, let me turn to our three speakers, each of whom will speak for summer between six and ten minute roughly speaking and then we will open up to questions or dialogue with respect to the audience. we will start with jim, if you are ready, give you the floor. >> my response ability for afghanistan goes back to 2001 and is fair to say the time was present for creation of the current regime and i start by looking back and try to spot the things we did wrong at the time and it strikes me there were three fundamental errors two of which i perceive that the time and tried to do something about and one of which i failed to proceed entirely and did nothing about. one was the decision not to deploy any american or international peacekeepers in the country. we have a country with no police force and no army and we decided security would be an afghan responsibility after the fall of the taliban. i think that was a major mistake. the second was to allow the coalition we successfully built for the war and the peace conference disintegrate.
pakistan, with respect to the important issues regarding the region. we called the event "back to the future." some people have spoken before about this, and what we mean by that. i think we will let that emerged as the discussion goes on. we know we have a lot of fundamental issues to talk about. certainly, military presence has been an issue talked about in the newspapers all lot. governance is an important issue. technical issues, such as what type of agreements might be signed between the u.s. and afghanistan, are important. the role of pakistan. many others. with that, let me turn to our three speakers, each of whom will speak for six to 10 minutes, roughly speaking. then we'll open it up to dialogue, with the audience. i will give you the floor. >> my responsibilities for afghanistan go back to 2001. it is fair to say i was present at the creation of at least the current regime in kabul. i started by looking back and trying to spot the things we did wrong. it strikes me that there were three fundamental errors, two of which are perceived at the time and tried to do someth
to the to union, the former ambassador and the former secretary of pakistan to be hosted by the atlantic council here in washington, this is about 90 minutes. >> we are delighted to have you all. we are delighted to have our distinguished guests. it's pretty rare i think that you get three extraordinary ambassadors sitting next to one another each of whom has tremendous familiarity with the subject. on the council itself has been working on these issues for quite a number of years. this is actually the fourth anniversary of the salvation center. some of you may remember a few years ago the council did a very substantial report with respect to afghanistan. the then head of the council and the national security adviser was involved with some of the people in the audience involved frigate and we followed up on some of that work continuously over the last several years could get this is the latest installment if you will. i think that we all know that we are at an inflection point with respect to afghanistan to read a lot of the important decisions coming. president karzai is here to meet with presi
personally intervened to resolve a diplomatic crises and difficult places from pakistan and afghanistan to egypt and sudan. and i really look forward to working with you on some of the challenging issues as it faces the country in the world but we start back to something and number of senators have referred to in your opening statement which you said. i just want to say i've been deeply encouraged by your response to senator shaheen's comments and senator rubio. we are sadly foreign commercial service woefully underrepresented and wherever opportunity to advocate for american business and american values and as you know i chaired to the hearings on this. we are about to come out with a report from the subcommittee and i would be interested as the first of my several questions and how you see has successfully competing with china which has a rapidly growing footprint across africa in both economic opportunities and in our differing values agenda and what that makes doing for and how you would address that as secretary e and senator coons were a terrific team with respect to africa and i
. that means there is huge room for catching up. and then, of course, there is pakistan, bangladesh, vietnam, many countries in asia. so i'm quite optimistic about the long term growth prospect of asia as a whole. >> reporter: the asian economy has stayed relatively firm despite a recession in europe and a slowdown in the u.s. but kudo points out that more cooperation is needed in the region to prepare for further headwinds. >> i think countries should create more to try to stabilize interregional relationship. most of the countries have no capital and they trade freely. it has been at the center of the regional cooperation in asia and it needs regional development and will continue to be so or they must strengthen their activities in the area of regional corporation integration. >> a pakistani girl who was shot by islamic militants has been discharged from a british hospital. the hospital said that the 15-year-old left the day before because shes with well enough to stay with her family in britain. she was shot in the head in october by the pakistani taliban for supporting girls' rights to
has been stepping up relations with india's neighbors, including pakistan, sri lanka, bangladesh and myanmar by offering them frastructure projects. india is concerned that china's growing military presence may spread between the strait into the indian ocean, a key oil shipping lane. last year, india successfully test fired a ballistic missile with a range of 5,000 kilometers. it can cover most of asia. india unveiled the missile during a military parade in new delhi the day before it tested the k-5. the country seems to be showing off its weapon development capabilities. china and the pakistan are bolstering their military cooperation by engaging in joint exercises while india is steadily upgrading its military on the back of its economic might. if india succeeds in arming its nuclear submarine with the k-5, it will add up to a powerful option in its military strategy. the country's continuing missile program is likely to stir up the region. nhk world, new delhi. >>> and that wraps up our bulletin, i'm dhra dhirakaosal in bangkok. >> dhra, thanks. >>> australia's east coast has
ocean. china has been stepping up relations with india's neighbors, including pakistan, sri lanka, bangladesh and myanmar, by offering them infrastructure projects. india is concerned that china's roving military presence may spread beyond the straits into the indian ocean. a key oil shipping lane. last year, india successfully test fired a ballistic missile with a range of 5,000 kilometers. it can cover most of asia. a military parade in new delhi the day before it tested the k-5. the country seems to be showing off its weapon development capabilities. china and pakistan are bolstering their military cooperation by engaging in joint exercises. while india is steadily upgrading its military on the back of its economic might. if india succeeds in arming its nuclear submarine with the k-5, it will add a powerful option in its military strategy. the country's continuing missile program is likely to start. nhk world, new delhi. >>> developed countries invest billions of dollars in aid every year to help developing nations. it's known as official development assistance or oda. and it c
, pakistan, and sudan. historians will judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to egypt. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he has been to egypt and every time, colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator has a colin -- it is what we do. we fight for people back home. as secretary, john will understand that and bend over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific bridge from the hill to the administration. i know that john kerry cares deeply about our country and our national security. i know he believes in
reportedly has decided to exclude cia drone strikes in pakistan from new legal oversight for targeted killings overseas. the washington post reports counter-terrorism adviser and cia-nominee john brennan has signed off on a plan to exempt the drone attacks in pakistan from a list of operations that would be covered under newly enacted rules. areas covered in the so-called play book include the process for adding names to kill lists, the principles for killing u.s. citizens abroad, and the command chain for authorizing cia or u.s. military strikes outside war zones. the exemption of drone strikes in pakistan would allow the cia to continue carrying them without -- tearing them without a legal framework for a to two years. the hostage standoff in a jury of his ended in the deaths of dozens of people, including up to 48 of the captured workers. algerian forces say they recovered at least 25 bodies after storming the militant held gas complex saturday, bringing the confirmed death toll to least 80. witnesses say the hostages were brutally executed. the toll could have been worse as hundre
, washington. >>> and we head next overseas to pakistan, a country so vital to the u.s. war on terror and home to an estimated 100 nuclear weapons. tonight, in turmoil. tens of thousands swarming the streets, vowing to overthrow the government after an arrest warrant for pakistani's prime minister. and abc's muhammad lila was there, sending us a quick dispatch from the street. >> reporter: all night, protesters have been moving closer and closer to the country's parliament. all that separates them now from the heart of the government are those shipping containers. >>> and from muhammad lila there in the middle of pakistan's demonstrations, we move the now, you see these pictures in syria. they are new pictures of the disaster in that long fight tonight. this was a university, classrooms, dormitories. after two explosions in the city of aleppo. more than 80 people killed. the government and the rebels are each blaming each other for the blasts. >>> and we move on next to this nation, fighting the flu. and tonight, some new post cards from the front lines of america's epidemic. now, even worryin
and successful diplomatic intervention in afghanistan, pakistan, and sedan. -- sudan. historians will be judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy at much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i want to ask john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to eject. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he has been to egypt and every time, colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator has -- it is what we do. we fight for people back,. as secretary, john will understand that and bend over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific bridge from the hill to the administration. i know that john kerry cares deeply about our c
for catching up. then there are pakistan, bangladesh, vietnam. many countries in asia. i'm quite optimistic about the long determine growth prospect of asia as a whole. >> reporter: the asian economy has stayed relatively firm despite a recession in europe in the slowdown in the u.s. he points out more cooperation is needed in the region to prepare for further head winds. >> i think they should call it more to try to stabilize interregional relationship. we will continue to be our strengths and activities in the area of cooperation. >> japan'sew government has pledged more to myanmar to help economic development. japan's finance minister was in the capital to meet myanmar's president. aso met finance and revenue minister. >> translator: we hope to maintain good bilateral relations just like our predecessors. >> japan is considering more loans an grants. that's to help improve business infrastructure such as power and water systems. japan plans to play a leading role in building the special economic zone near myanmar's largest city. they hope mor japanese businesses wl setp in t area. more b
of competition from pakistan and china. chinese authorities have tested out a jumbo cargo plane made in china. it runs 47 metres long. it can fly nonstop for 7,800 kilometers. it can carry more than 60 kinds of cargo. state-runneme media says the airplane runs better than the jumbo model currently in use. the report says it's on par with a cargo plane used by the u.s. military, the c-17 globemaster. china is the fourth nation to develop a jumbo cargo plane after the u.s., russia and the ukraine. the russia and ukranian planes used technology inherited from the soviet era. >>> satellite was launched for national security and other purposes. the rocket blasted off from tanagashi space center in southern japan. the satellite went into orbit around the earth at the desired altitude. this marks the 16th straight successful launch of h2a rockets. it is equipped with a radar system. it can take images at night and in bad weather. it can identify objects on earth as small as 1 metre from 700 kilometres in space. the device will also be used in dealing with disasters. the japanese government began lau
three questions. one is afghanistan, the sec is pakistan. with regard to afghanistan, i wanted to ask you about the first question relates to president karzai and the leches ahead of them. when he was here just a couple of weeks ago, i had the chance to visit with him in leader mcconnel's office and a number of senators as well. and to ask him directly about the elections and ask him about my second question. but i wanted to get your sense of where you see those lexes going. what efforts you can undertake to make sure that they are free and fair because they've been, i think, central to the next chapter in this transition. i just wanted to comment on that. the second question as it relates to afghanistan is one that senator boxer raised and her work on this has been exemplary, on women and girls and in particular, i have a -- an amendment that we got through the national defense authorization act which would require both state and defense to file a report on the efforts to promote the security of afghan women and girls just by way of itemization monitoring and responding to changes in
. >>> pakistan says indian troops attacked a military post today killing one soldier. indian's army is accuse offend crossing the border in kashmir which is known as the line of control between pakistan and india. a pakistani military statement said fighting continues in the region. >>> retired general stanley mcchrystal is speaking out for the first time since he resigned more than two years ago. in his new memoir he accepts blame for a "rolling stone" article that ended his career and also questions the article's fairness and accuracy. he was the top commander in afghanistan when he resigned and stepped down after the article quoted his aides criticizing president obama's team, including vice president biden. >>> those are your headlines "reliable sources" is at the top of the hour and now back to fareed zakaria "gps. quaes. >>> shame, elation, confusion, irstation, disbelief. those were just some of the emotions americans felt this week as they watched the painful process of democracy in action or in inaction as they went over the fiscal cliff. i was in london. i was furious how it all loo
libya and egypt and syria and pakistan. we are talking about a world that is changing and is less responsive to u.s. pressure and u.s. military power and diplomacy. that changes something that chuck hagel is aware of and he has well-formed views on. at the heart of that view is that power should be diffused away from the american military and plates and other power centers around the world and that idea itself is controversial. president obama agrees with that and many in congress do not. host: the former senator gave an interview with his former state paper, "the lincoln journal star" he said his critics have distorted his views. guest: it is unusual for a to give any interviews at all but he has faced a much criticism that he wanted to get one opening salvo out there and that is what he did. he basically said that he will have a chance to correct the record during his confirmation hearing. we should note from that interview that he is not backing down from any of his positions. he is not saying he no longer believes in the things that he believed in that were so controversial. h
served as a senior advisor as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrook, a former munk debater. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasser. [applause] now, when you think of provocative conversation on a big foreign policy challenges of the day, you have to think about our next debater. his flagship global affairs program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide. but he is anything but a talking head on cable tv. he writes a highly respected column for the post and is the editor at large of "time" magazine. his numerous best selling books include "the post-american world" and "the future of freedom." please welcome back broadcaster and journalist, fareed zakaria. [applause] now we are just momenting from getting our debate under way but before we hear from opening statements, one again i'm going to need this audience's assistance as the night goes on to make sure our debaters stay on time in terms of their opening and closing remarks and that we move forward as a debate together. so you will see this countdown clock, this handy clock appear. when it rea
suddenly without warning. the drone strike which killed several militants in pakistan's rugged tribal area is causing new controversy. jill dougherty has details for us. what's going on some. >> wolf, u.s. official now is confirming the death of that key warlord. he is not saying how he died but he does say that he and his men were directly responsible for planning and carrying out cross border attacks on coalition forces in afghanistan as well as providing protection for al qaeda forces in pakistan. pakistani intelligence officials tell cnn what they believe was a u.s. drone has killed a key pakistani taliban commander in south waziristan. pakistani warlord who sent his men to afghanistan to fight u.s. and nato troops. the pentagon is not confirming his death but senior officials are calling reports that he died a major development. nazeer, they say, had a lot of blood on his hands. george little, pemt gone spokesman said, any time a bad guy has a bad day, it's a good day for us. but in pakistan, fury over the killing. a man who played both sides. >> he was one of the top commanders of th
public and successful diplomatic interventions in afghanistan, pakistan and sudan. i think one day historians will judge his senate years in temperatures terms of his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many recognize senator ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, john has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or government but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said, it's the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he's been working quietly to help a father from newton, massachusetts, colin bauer, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to egypt. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he's been to egypt since then and every time colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator here has a colin bauer. it's what we do. we fight for people back home. as secretary, john will understand that and bend over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific brid
, including the areas most closer to pakistan. >> ambassador, i was struck by the last question that the president was asked at his joint press conference about afghan women. and in response, he said, in part, the afghan constitution protects the rights of afghan women and the u.s. strongly believes that afghanistan cannot succeed unless it gives opportunity to its women. what is the reality right now for women and girls in afghanistan? and what is the reality likely to be for women and girls after the u.s. troop presence is withdrawn? >> in the major cities in kabul, obviously, it's been a huge renaissance of women's rights and across the country and the u.s. military empowered young women building schools and institutions to promote women's rights and microfinance. but when you get closer outside the countryside, away from the major cities, there have been attacks by the taliban on schools, against women, and so, this is where the fault line lies. the women who are furthest away from the major cities of the -- that are under the control of the central government most at risk o
for islamist militants from pakistan. the assault killed more than 160 people, including six americans. headley could have gotten life in prison, but federal prosecutors in chicago asked for a more lenient sentence, citing his cooperation. the united nations opened a special investigation today into drone warfare. it will focus on civilian casualties resulting from strikes aimed at suspected terror cells. under president obama, the c.i.a. has stepped up drone attacks, especially in pakistan. britain and israel also use the unmanned aircraft. the u.n. report is due in october. in economic news, first-time claims for unemployment benefits hit a five-year low last week. if that trend continues, it could signal a better job market. and on wall street, the dow jones industrial average gained 46 points to close at 13,825. but the nasdaq fell 23 points to close at 3,130. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: president obama's nominee for secretary of state - - senator john kerry -- took the first step toward senate confirmation today. newshour congressional correspond
. iraq, afghanistan and pakistan so every country in the world we are under the kind of contracting world that i think do interfere with our capacity to get the best deal, particularly when it comes to security that we should in these countries where the threats unfortunately are going to always be with us. >> should we look to extend that to the drc come to somalia? >> there was an article i think in one of the newspapers today that went into some detail. basically years has started. federal law required the state department to select the cheapest rather than the best contractor to provide local card services at its embassies abroad and there's that old saying you get what you pay for and this lowest price provision started off in 1990, but it has just stayed with us and i would respectfully request that this committee would take a hard look at it. you can't do a total lifting of it for everybody at least look at the highest post where obviously we did it for iraq and afghanistan and pakistan and the countries that you are naming our countries that i think would fall into that category.
of afghanistan and pakistan -- previously opposed the surge in afghanistan. these are issues the need to be addressed. where do we think afghanistan is going to go? why did he think at one point that afghanistan was such a strategic interest? senator hagel has made a lot of statements over the years about the middle east and central asia that i think have to be addressed. israel-u.s. relationships have to be put into context. i think the caller started them. but the fact is not simply that it is between the u.s. and israel, there are statements the senator made on the sanctions on iran. top of the dictatorship in syria. not signing on to a resolution, asking europe to designate hezbollah as a terrorist organization. on and on. the context suggests that his views about the middle east and his use about the palestinian it-is really conflict have to be brought together with those other statements to get a bigger picture of how he thinks about the middle east. i think it is rare that a nominee -- i do think that people often say the president should give deference to his and -- to his app
in northwest pakistan killed 13 people, including a senior military commander. >> the commander, no less mullah nazir, was among nine people killed in the first strike. >> pakistan officials say they're upset about the strike not only because it was inside their country but also because they have a truce with the militant. but the u.s. he planned attacks on u.s. troops across the border in afghanistan. >> the death toll from series 21 month old civil war now exceed 60,000. >> that is according to the united nations. >> the numbers are higher than recent estimates by activists opposed to president bashars assads regime. >> they put death toll at 45,000. >> meanwhile, the un refuge agency said about 84,000 people fled syrria last month alone. >> about half a million have been displaced since the civil war. >> police in india filed rape and murder charges against five men accused of attacking a woman on a bus in new delhi . >> the attack has sparked outrage and protest cosacross the country demanding greater protection for women. >> a sixth suspect is believed to be a jew without respect to be tr
in pakistan. the teachers were on the way home working from primary school for girls. the attack was a reminder of the risk to women and essential kateors. and aide workers from the islamic militants who opposed their work in that country. there were more than just fireworks lighting up the sky over iran with the new year's. the country has been spending the last few days launching barrage of missile tests in the critical passal way for oil in the world. correspondent leland vittert with more on what is behind tehran latest saber rattling. >> in heavily publicly publicized war games on iran tv, iran knavery proudly showed off -- iran navy showed off the antiship vessels and mines, those to be used to disrupt shipping in the strait of hormuz. sea channel that cuts between uran and united arab emirates through a fifth of the world's oil flows. >> no oil will be transported through the strait, threatened the iran deputy head of the commission of foreign affairs. no matter by the tankers or the her chant ships he continued. since the 1980s, iran used the strait as strategic trump car
became disenchanted with the government and military of pakistan we cut off military assistance to the pakistani military and that led to a very negative consequences. so while some of these choices are very difficult, i'm inclined in the direction of greater, rather than lesser engagement. i don't think there is any point in just wiping our hands of these situations. lou: and, you talked about declining powers. does the obama administration's intelligence council in a new report that i just referred to, talks abouted day which the united states will no longer be a superpower but so-called first among equals. they project the date is somewhere around 2030. your thoughts and reckoning on the date and whether or not you agree with that, if you will, not decline, ascension of other powers? >> right. i certainly think that since the financial crisis back in 2007 and 2008, there has been a tendency to write us down, if you will. you think many of those assessments have been unduly pessimistic. i think even down right wrong at times. we're still the most powerful economy in the world.
on the job. >>> new this morning from pakistan shiites in the city that was hit yesterday by several terror attacks that killed 120 people they are refusing to bury the dead. it's a protest to demand that the government do something to protect them from attacks by sunni extremists. >>> in less than an hour from right now a very critical meeting agains between president obama and hamid karzai. as kyla campbell reports the outcome could determine how many american troops come home this year. kyla. >> reporter: dave more than 60,000 u.s. troops are in afghanistan right now. president obama has not determined how many will leave the middle east this year. the u.s. war on terror in afghanistan officially ends next year. u.s. and nato forces are set to leave by the year of 2014. this year afghan forces are supposed to take the lead in security and that means thousands of u.s. traps could return home. but president obama is open to keeping anywhere from 3,000 to 15,000 u.s. troops in afghanistan. after the end of the war next year. the u.s. leaders want to make sure afghan officials can run their
availability on thursday afternoon. >> what is happening at the india and pakistan border? this time it is kind of a serious matter took place and fightings are happening at the border. according to -- [indiscernible] with president karzai coming here and things going on in washington and what is happening in afghanistan. what if india -- it might be hurting inya. >> well, the issue of tensions between india and pakistan is something that the secretary knows very well. we all hope that we can maintain peace and stability in the region. the secretary has affirmed that on visits throughout that region including to india. on tissue of terrorism, let me say that we stand with everyone in the world to include those in india and pakistan who take a hard line against terrorists who want to kill civilians whether they are pakistani, indian or american civilians. we believe there needs to be a united front against terrorist groups operating in that part of the world and others. >> as transition to what is the last time that the secretary had been asked by yained of any kind of help -- are they going to
that is a good idea. the fact is, afghanistan and pakistan, that nexus, the tribal border region there that is poorly defined and poured a controlled is perhaps the most dangerous place in the world to the united states. it is where al qaeda and began. it is where the remnants of al qaeda still exists. there was a drone strike reported within the last 24 hours against terrorists in that region. that is an area that will remain a threat for the foreseeable future. we can conduct drones strikes, gather intelligence, continue to keep an eye on that area, stabilize it and influence the direction it goes, because that is the part of the world that puts the united states most at risk. host: a sovereignty issue for pakistan, but also, karzai is expected to bring up sovereignty issues for afghanistan. what will he be saying? guest: president karzai correctly feels that he does not have control of what is going on inside his country. special operations, conducting raids inside afghanistan late at night without necessarily afghan permission, or not necessarily the afghans always doing is q
is we favor the kill and capture peace especially in pakistan and yemen and somalia and other states. i don't think we have great strategies to wage political warfare and that is a gap that needs to be built and i think we can be -- we can draw lessons from the days of of the cold war as to how to do that. and the need to do that was brought home to me by a meeting i had a few years ago. i think it was in 2008 in baghdad with a fellow named i love lucy who was a very brave iraqi parliamentarian, either brave for suicidal and maybe some combination of the two, who dared to visit on a couple of occasions and thought iraq should normalize elections with israel for which sentiments face attempts to give him presents in an iraqi court. he did not however manage to stop the extremists who have tracked his sons and killed his two sons for his retaliation for visiting israel. he ran for parliament in one of seidin 2005 but i remember meeting with him in his living room in baghdad in 2000 where he was showing the fact that he had little money to run for re-election and little money with like-min
qaeda was central al qaeda in pakistan. afghanistan was still operating, largely with impunity. and our alliances in the world were shredded. there was tremendous antipathy toward the administration and the country, and that has all changed. everyone at this table would agree that the world is a very complicated and dangerous place because of a lot of different forces, a guy setting himself on fire in tunisia and a whole region goes up, and because of social media. so we are living in a different world, and what we need to do is to be smart about where we engage and when we engage, because we cannot project force everywhere in the world and we don't have the resources and it is not a smart way to proceed. >> the drone policy has spread all over the world. and that is sort of what we're known by best. and to the arab spring, the united states was not a passive observer in this. yes, a fruit vendor in tunisia set himself on fire. yes, there was social media that helped spread this enthusiasm for change. but the united states did turn its back on mubarak in egypt. and i think we're going t
in pakistan. britain and israel also use the unmanned aircraft. the u.n. report is due in october. in economic news, rst-time claims founemployment benefits hit a five-year low last week. if that trend continues, it could signal a better job market. and on wall street, the dow jones industrial average gained 46 points to close at 13,825. but the nasdaq fell 23 points to close at 3,130. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: president obama's nominee for secretary of state - - senator john kerry -- took the first step toward senate confirmation today. newshour congressional correspondent kwame holman reports. >> reporter: for john kerry, it was a day long in coming. the diplomat's son, veteran senator, and former democratic presidential nominee has been considered a potential secretary of state for years. >> you've almost lived your entire life for this moment. >> reporter: indeed, kerry first appeared before the senate foreign relations committee in 1971, as a vietnam veteran challenging senators over the war. >> we cannot fight communism all over the world and
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)